Fashion will be more voluminous and angular

Inspiration for next spring and summer was brought by the traditional trade fair lecture delivered by the fashion trends specialist Ellen Haeser from the Netherlands. Looser and more voluminous clothes will head for women’s wardrobes; the inspiration for them lies mainly in the 1970s and the 1990s.

 

Inspiration for next spring and summer was brought by the traditional trade fair lecture delivered by the fashion trends specialist Ellen Haeser from the Netherlands. Looser and more voluminous clothes will head for women’s wardrobes; the inspiration for them lies mainly in the 1970s and the 1990s.


Every year, merchants look for information which would help them better grasp the new fashion trends, and for inspiration for what to order for their shops. At the STYL and KABO trade fairs they are helped with this by a professional lecture, which shows not only fashion trends for the following year, but also key pieces of clothing which will sell well.

A striking change in women’s wardrobes will be the shift to cleaner and sharper lines. Square coats without collars, asymmetrically cut skirts, and long, straight vests combined with a new type of broad and voluminous trousers in shortened length will be fashionable this year. Tops will also have irregular lines, and contrasting colours will be important, whether in graphic patterns or in combinations of large and sharply defined colour areas. Newly the fabrics will be combined with materials such as leather or suede, and brown in a variety of neutral and natural shades, including chocolate, is making its way to summer fashion. A clean look with sharply cut edges will be typical. Not only coats but also dresses will often be double-breasted cuts. Popularity continuing from past seasons will be enjoyed by shimmery and metallic materials and graphic prints. Neoprene materials, which take their inspiration from sports, allow being cut into a net. Actual net fabrics, lace, or lightweight transparent fabrics in voluminous cuts will also be worn. All of these trends are also reflected in accessories. The new bags are sharp, angular, and contrastingly colourful, but bulky bags typical of the nineties, newly for example with graphic patterns, are also returning.

Another determining trend is a handmade look with bright colours and ethnic motifs. The bohemian style finds its inspiration in Africa, in the style of South American Indians, and in cowboy romantics. Layering is typical, as well as draping and decorating with fringes. Materials used include linen and knitwear, and delicate graphic patterns and colour melanges are also used. An interesting new colour is the mango yellow, which is combined nicely with white or with neutral shades. Cowboy fashion is back in a romantic form and brings for example farmers’ blouses with rich ornamentations and wide sleeves, which can be perfectly matched with jeans. The Western romance style includes fringes and suede. The new bohemian style brings wildness and freedom, a typical piece of clothing is represented by simply cut, printed, sleeveless maxi dresses.

Layering fans will certainly welcome the new variant of a short underskirt, combined with a long mesh or lace skirt. Lace will be applied to tops as well, for example to blouses of an angular cut, but besides the classic form, it will often be in an irregular, almost organic or gossamer form. Flared trousers from the 1970s are making a comeback, as well as denim in a variety of forms, ranging from classic dark blue to stonewashed white. Another novelty is a long narrow skirt lined with a wide flounce. And those who are not afraid of colours can really enjoy themselves. Not only distinctive graphic motifs and white stripes, the materials for next spring and summer radiate with an entire collage of vivid colours with bold accents in graphic and iridescent patterns. The popularity of floral prints continues, from tiny to large prints which almost look like wallpapers. Comfortable long dresses made of knitted fabrics, often with wide stripes, will be worn as well, and the popularity of pleating, as well as other materials with a 3D effect, i.e. various cut-throughs, folds, ruffles, etc., returns.

And what will be the key pieces of wardrobe for the next spring and summer? According to Ellen Haeser it will be for example bulky double-breasted trench coats or angular jackets. Dresses will be worn in lengths up to the ground, with a slender silhouette, and decorated with draping or sharply defined areas of contrasting colours. Another option will be A-cut skirts with a high waist. Regarding lengths, everything from scarf miniskirts to impractical maxi dresses will be worn. Besides the already popular pleated tunics, angularly cut tops and 1970s style wide loose sleeves will appear.  Regarding materials, one of the novelties will be tops made of leather. But the biggest change awaits trousers. There will be a variety of options, from traditional narrow trousers or comfortable drop crotch tracksuit cuts, to wrap trousers, wide trousers with two rows of buttons, bell-bottoms, maxi long trousers, baggy trousers, or extra wide trousers with a shortened length.

A similar revolution does not await men’s fashion. Trouser length remains unshortened and new elements appear mainly in the waist area: interesting decorative details, prominent buttons, cord belts, folds, and newly pleating as well. Stripes, checks, and graphic designs are moving from shirts to jackets, and voluminous scarves and shawls will become an important part of men’s wardrobe. Similarly to women’s fashion, there is a visible shift toward a bolder colour scheme, which does not avoid contrasting or bright shades of red, orange, or pink.