From trends to combinations, from Fast Fashion to values

The traditional trade fair lecture delivered by the Dutch designer Ellen Haeser outlined a new business model for sustainable fashion. Shops can make money both from the constant innovations and modifications of their merchandise, and from the increasing demand for timeless values and pursuit of one’s unique style. Such a concept needs a vision the customers can identify with and which they will themselves want to promote, along with the support of quality service and new technologies.

 

The traditional trade fair lecture delivered by the Dutch designer Ellen Haeser outlined a new business model for sustainable fashion. Shops can make money both from the constant innovations and modifications of their merchandise, and from the increasing demand for timeless values and pursuit of one’s unique style. Such a concept needs a vision the customers can identify with and which they will themselves want to promote, along with the support of quality service and new technologies.


All over the world there is a growing number of consumers who do not want to be slaves to fashion trends. They like to make smart investment decisions; they buy fewer things; their minds are set more on the quality than the quantity. Rather than throwing things out, they repair and recycle them. Instead of wearing fashion pieces which would make them fall in line with millions of others, they create their individual, personal style. For that they need to be comfortable with the art of combinations, and this is where Ellen Haeser sees the new role of businesses. “Gaining inspiration in shopping is about emotions which will never be provided by a smartphone, because emotions can only spring up in personal interactions,” says the Dutch expert. Her advice to businesses is to embrace this new marketing strategy based on a personal vision and empathy with their customers. “Shopping on its own is boring, customers want to explore and do something they can later talk about with their friends,” said Ellen Haeser and gave examples of successful businesses where shopping is combined with museums, galleries, or trendy restaurants. Even an interesting interior space, which customers would like to take pictures of and share them on social media, can be of great help.

The second part of Haeser’s presentation focused on styles, shapes, colors, and fabrics in women’s and men’s fashion for Fall/Winter of 2018/2019. The luxurious and special look remains popular; material-wise, velvet is king. We can see new, previously unimagined combinations, such as fabulous jacquards and soft plush dresses with austere shapes and functional cuts. Manchester and retro stripe and cube patterns are making a comeback. Animal prints and chain belts are also returning, cross body fanny packs and little scarfs are going to become new hit items as well. Some of the new “in” colors will be burnt orange, red-brown, and yellow as an accent.